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Buy As Gift. For this reason the representation of youth and youth culture in the novel Absolute Beginners by Colin MacInnes will be analysed. In the second chapter this paper introduces the novel with its main characters and the main themes. The third chapter then focuses on the theories of youth and youth culture from Ogersby.

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To combine the results drawn from the first two chapters, the fourth chapter deals with the question whether Absolute Beginners main character is represented as a typical teenager of the fifties or whether he is just a construction by the author. All the results of the paper are combined in the conclusion to prove whether the novel serves as a medium for representing youth cultures of the fifties in England or not.

This leads to the answer of the question how a piece of art can be taken as a basis for cultural studies. Product Details. Average Review. Write a Review.

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Related Searches. Absolute Armut in Deutschland. View Product. Zurzeit wird dabei oft The beats were ridiculed by most leading representatives of mainstream literary culture at the time. Critics sought to puncture their image of themselves as revolutionaries, accusing them of empty posturing: the beat style, they argued, was merely conformist in its own way.

However, more recent accounts of the beat writers seem to share the breathless mythologizing that was apparent in many of their pronouncements at the time. A great deal has been written about their lives, but much less about their work: a few celebrated stories are told and re-told Kerouac typing On the Road on a long roll of paper, Burroughs accidentally shooting his wife , yet there are very few detailed critical analyses of beat writing itself.

1. Introduction

David Sterritt usefully challenges the claim that their writing was all about spontaneous improvisation, and that this was something they shared with jazz; and he also points to their dubious attitudes towards Jews and African-Americans. Nevertheless, much contemporary writing about the beats is merely celebratory: a more measured, critical account is sorely needed. Subsequent media representations — including the parodic advertisements featured in the illustrated version of this essay — combined to create a familiar stereotype. Thus, beat men sported goatee beards, striped sailor shirts or black turtlenecks, sandals and berets, and wore dark sunglasses, even indoors and at night.

Beat women wore tight black sweaters or smocks, black tights or cropped jeans, and went barefoot; and their ghostly white complexion was accentuated by heavy black mascara.

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They recited poetry and played the bongo drums, while drinking espresso coffee, smoking marijuana and discussing existentialism late into the night. They were certainly just as vulnerable to parody. Perhaps the most famous beatnik of all was the character of Maynard G. Popular comedians, especially Lenny Bruce and Mort Sahl, also played heavily on the beatnik persona, albeit in a semi-parodic manner.

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And there were countless beat jokes and cartoons, which largely reinforced the stereotype of beats as lazy, incoherent, self-consciously cool and phony. While such popular media images might have seemed a long way from the revolutionary literary aspirations of Kerouac, Ginsberg and Burroughs, these authors also undoubtedly courted media attention on their own behalf.

While such images might have been intended to be satirical — or even, as in some of the films, to serve as a kind of moral warning to the young — that is not to say that they were always read in the same light by young people themselves. Another might be Michael Horowitz, who founded the poetry journal New Departures in while a student at Oxford, and later invited Ginsberg to London for the first International Poetry Incarnation at the Albert Hall in — although he is of a slightly younger generation. The angries appeared to give voice to a resentment against the repression and hypocrisy of conventional middle-class morality that they claimed was widely shared among young people.

Absolute Beginners by Colin MacInnes

For this, we will need to look elsewhere. Read more…. In his autobiography, Personal Copy , the journalist and broadcaster Ray Gosling describes a feeling of imminent change that was shared by many young people at the very end of the s: There was just this feeling… that we were important, that something was going to happen. Post to Cancel.